An old man drinks a beer.
15 May

Alcohol Abuse Rates Rise After Retirement

Statistically, most people know someone in their immediate lives who is or has struggled with alcohol abuse. Alcohol is, after all, the most abused substance on the planet, far and away. Currently, around one in twelve of all adults in the United States are classified as problem drinkers. However, one aspect of the prevalent alcohol abuse picture in the United States that doesn’t get talked about enough is the spike in alcohol abuse rates that happens around the retirement age. In particular, why do retirees struggle with alcohol so much more than other U.S. adults?

A homeless person sleeps on a bench.
01 May

Income Inequality Affects Recovery

Addiction is a behavioral disease that has affected every demographic in the United States, as well as throughout the world, regardless of class, color, or creed. However, it would be highly disingenuous to suggest that there aren’t socioeconomic factors that play a part in the landscape of addiction that we are witnessing today, especially if we, as a society, want to take meaningful steps to combat addiction and save lives. In particular, class economics have a big part to play in addiction, by the numbers. Here are some important things to remember about the connection between income inequality and addiction...

Woman stares at her drink
15 Apr

Alcoholism Rates of Women Continue to Climb

Alcoholism is a problem that has continued to grow in America. First of all, alcohol is the most abused substance in the world, by far, due to its social prevalence and its legality. Indeed, nearly 9% of adults in the United States report having drinking patterns that could be described as problematic. Amidst these facts, another alarming trend has begun to get noticed and studied: the particular rising rates of alcoholism in women. Essentially, more women today are drinking a lot more than most women did in the decades before. Here is some information about how alcoholism rates among women continue to climb...

A woman's hair blows as she holds her head.
01 Apr

Why Moralizing Addiction Doesn’t Work

Addiction has proven itself to be one of the most major social problems of our time. The rates of addiction have continued to climb, since the turn of the century, and the opioid epidemic is a sure sign that there are many aspects of addiction that have to be addressed. The good news is that the awareness for addiction has continued to climb, as well. This means that more steps are being taken to help solve the problem. However, we have to be careful to control the narrative in which addiction is viewed. In particular, the view that addiction is a moral evil is something that we must take great pains to prevent. Here is why moralizing addiction doesn’t work...

Girl conducting a science experiment
15 Mar

Starting Opioid Education Earlier

The opioid epidemic has continued to spread over the past decade, as the amount of prescription painkillers being sold has continued to climb. Not only has the abuse of these prescription opioids caused a very severe problem in and of themselves, but these substances often work as a pipeline that pushes people towards harder street drugs, such as heroin, in order to get a stronger high for less money.

However, if you want to fight against this epidemic, the first step is knowing exactly what it is and how you can help: education. It’s for this reason that a couple states have already opted to start opioid education earlier in public schools...