Is meditation helpful in getting off recreational drugs?

Jan 20, 2022

Recreational drugs can be a hard habit to break, but there are tools that can help with the transition. We reached out to our readers to find out how they think meditation can play a role in getting off recreational drugs. Keep reading to see what they had to say.

Matt Glowiak

Matt Glowiak

Matt Glowiak, PhD, LCPC at Choosing Therapy.

Meditation Helps with Grounding

A common struggle with the recovery process is that of urges or cravings. For some, these seem to appear spontaneously, while for many others, they are triggered by a particular person, place, or thing. When cravings strike, it feels as though nothing else in the world matters other than getting the fix. The mind becomes hyper-focused, and the sensation is all-consuming. Although logically they realize that the craving will pass with time, even the shortest amount of time feels like an eternity.

Meditation helps ground the individual. Beginning with a comfortable posture, closing one’s eyes, taking deep breaths, followed by clearing one’s mind or focusing on something calming, individuals can effectively place mind over matter. That is, they may meditate away the craving and return to their previous state.

From a physiological perspective, it activates the parasympathetic nervous system, which calms everything down from blood flow to oxygen intake, allowing the slowing of negative thoughts and emotions. Meditation, like running a marathon, takes time and practice. For many, meditation may be frustrating at first.

Concentration can be easily broken, and it does not feel as though it is working. With time and practice, it becomes much easier and can be sustained for longer periods. Ultimately, it becomes a go-to. Beyond helping one abstain from drug use, there are numerous other health benefits. Meditation is a win-win.

Meditation Provides Perspective

Yes, meditation helps individuals get off recreational drugs. It helps you calm your mind and focus on one thing. It also helps you reduce stress, which is a factor for people who are dependent on drugs.

Meditation teaches you about yourself and gives you time to reflect on your life. It teaches you how to be happy and content with what you have, instead of always wanting more. This helps you develop better coping mechanisms when dealing with cravings for drugs or alcohol.

Meditation also gives you perspective on how lucky you are to be alive and healthy when others are not so fortunate. It gives substance to the saying, “Live each day as if it were your last.”

Emily Newman

Emily Newman

Emily Newman is a Psychic reader, spiritual healer, counselor, and astrologer at the best of Psychic Readers.

Janet Coleman

Janet Coleman

Janet Coleman from TheConsumerMag.

Meditation Provides Perspective

Yes, meditation helps individuals get off recreational drugs. It helps you calm your mind and focus on one thing. It also helps you reduce stress, which is a factor for people who are dependent on drugs.

Meditation teaches you about yourself and gives you time to reflect on your life. It teaches you how to be happy and content with what you have, instead of always wanting more. This helps you develop better coping mechanisms when dealing with cravings for drugs or alcohol.

Meditation also gives you perspective on how lucky you are to be alive and healthy when others are not so fortunate. It gives substance to the saying, “Live each day as if it were your last.”

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